London has most expensive construction costs in Europe, second in the world



  • The International Construction Costs Index published by Arcadis, analyses the relative costs of construction across 44 major cities, and also shows a crucial imbalance in London’s expensive construction market.
  • London is the most expensive city in Europe and the second most expensive city worldwide in which to build, according to an index from a global design and consultancy business.
  • At the other end the least expensive cities for construction are Taipei, Bangalore, Bangkok, Kula Lumpur, Ho Chi Min, Bucharest, Prague, Sarajevo, Sofia and Jakarta.
  • Overall the top city is New York, with Hong Kong in third place followed by Geneva and Macau.
  • Cost premiums in the top cities range from 40% to 60% in comparison with other European counterparts.


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The Big 5 opens today with thousands of certified products on display



  • Counting both ongoing and planned construction projects, the GCC’s construction pipeline totals $2.8 trillion, especially in mixed-use mega-developments, airports and seaports, and transportation infrastructure, according to the recent report by Deloitte.
  • “The Middle East is seeing nationwide transformation in construction innovation, with projects for mega-events such as World Expo 2020 in Dubai and 2022 FIFA World Cup Qatar stretching design boundaries.
  • The building and construction sector in Jebel Ali Free Zone (Jafza) has witnessed 74 per cent growth in the last five years growing from Dh10.7 billion in 2009 to Dh18.6 billion in 2014.
  • Advancing government BIM mandates further demonstrate the Middle East’s desire to be on par with global innovators in the construction field,” Paul Wallett, area business director, Tekla Middle East, said in a statement.
  • Among the top visiting countries to the event will be the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Iran, India, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Egypt and Pakistan.


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Construction sector returns to modest growth



  • THE construction sector returned to modest growth in June after a slowdown over the previous two months, official figures show.
  • Construction output in June was 2.6 per cent higher year-on-year, below economists’ forecasts of a 3.3 per cent rise but still the fastest growth since March.
  • The ONS added that the second quarter construction figure is higher than the flat output estimate it used to calculate gross domestic product (GDP) for the quarter last month.
  • But it added this small upward revision to construction did not point to any material revision to the ONS preliminary estimate of 0.7 per cent GDP growth in the second quarter of this year.
  • The ONS said: “Despite this increase the data for June 2015 continues a run of relatively weak monthly growth.”


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Turkey’s mega projects: Pipe dreams or game-changers?



  • Proponents of such major development projects see this as Turkey’s march toward becoming a fully developed and even more prosperous country, saying a resource-poor country can generate wealth through large-scale construction projects.
  • But critics are insistent that regulations are being violated or ignored, and the massive environmental damage these projects could cause will hurt the country even more in the long term.
  • This is not the case with this old centralist mindset that exists at the moment,” he told MEE.

    “These people [the government] see these big construction projects as purely a source to make money for themselves and those close to them,” he added.

  • The construction of hundreds of hydroelectric power stations in the region is also a major point of contention.
  • Local media reports say that work is continuing at some sites despite a local court ordering a halt to construction activity.


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Carter lands £35m aircraft design centre deal Ι Construction Enquirer



  • R G Carter has started work on a £35m research centre at Cranfield University that will change the design of future aircraft.
  • Adjacent areas introduce space for manufacturers to conduct private research, alongside office space, and meeting rooms for the university research team and partners.
  • Architects CPMG have designed the Aerospace Integration Research Centre (AIRC) and groundwork has now begun at the Bedfordshire site

    The centre will bring together academic research and testing of new ideas by co-investment partners Rolls-Royce and Airbus.

  • This will provide a showcase for the university and its partners, accommodating exhibitions and conferencing, as well as informal meeting areas.
  • The three-storey building includes an open laboratory space with a 40m clear span, capable of housing large airframe integration projects, presentation and visualisation space alongside state-of-the-art simulation facilities.


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