Industrial Construction in the UAE to 2019: Market Forecast – openPR

  • The construction sector can be broadly classified into five categories: Commercial, Industrial, Infrastructure, Institutional and Residential.
  • The reasons for this growth can be attributed to various macroeconomic factors conducive to the construction sector.Key Macroeconomic Trends Driving Growth in UAE Industrial Construction SectorUAE is one of the most diversified economies in the Gulf region.
  • Looking at the Middle East, UAE can be seen as one of the fastest growing economy, with its construction industry ranked third among the construction industries of the Middle East countries.
  • The construction industry is third largest economic activity after oil and trade, in the UAE, including approximately 6000 companies with most of the construction activities taking place in Abu Dhabi and Dubai.
  • The industry’s output value in real terms is forecast to rise at a CAGR of 6.52% in the next five years period; up from 3.55% during the period 2010-2014.The promising future of the construction industry can be seen by observing its past trend.


GCC Hosts Record High USD 3 Trillion in Construction Projects

  • Counting both ongoing and planned construction projects the GCC’s construction pipeline totals USD 2.8 trillion especially in mixed-use mega-developments airports and seaports and transportation infrastructure according to the recent report “GCC Powers of Construction 2015” by Deloitte.
  • At The Big 5 Tekla is showcasing its BIM software Tekla Structures 21 and Tekla Structural Designer along with Tekla BIMsight an open BIM viewer and Tekla Field 3D for viewing BIM models on smartphones and tablets.
  • (MENAFN Press) Tekla to Further Integrate with Trimble Delivering Global Best Practices in Construction Technology to Middle East

    Dubai United Arab Emirates: GCC contractors must adopt the latest construction software to ensure the swift delivery of nearly USD 3 trillion worth of construction projects industry experts declared today ahead of The Big 5 construction exhibition.

  • Advancing government BIM mandates further demonstrate the Middle East’s desire to be on par with global innovators in the construction field” said Paul Wallett Area Business Director Tekla Middle East.
  • From BIM to holographic technology to real estate management software we’ll deliver best practices in technology to help the Middle East’s architecture engineering and construction firms deliver on innovation agendas” added Paul Wallett.


The Big 5 opens today with thousands of certified products on display

  • Counting both ongoing and planned construction projects, the GCC’s construction pipeline totals $2.8 trillion, especially in mixed-use mega-developments, airports and seaports, and transportation infrastructure, according to the recent report by Deloitte.
  • “The Middle East is seeing nationwide transformation in construction innovation, with projects for mega-events such as World Expo 2020 in Dubai and 2022 FIFA World Cup Qatar stretching design boundaries.
  • The building and construction sector in Jebel Ali Free Zone (Jafza) has witnessed 74 per cent growth in the last five years growing from Dh10.7 billion in 2009 to Dh18.6 billion in 2014.
  • Advancing government BIM mandates further demonstrate the Middle East’s desire to be on par with global innovators in the construction field,” Paul Wallett, area business director, Tekla Middle East, said in a statement.
  • Among the top visiting countries to the event will be the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Iran, India, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Egypt and Pakistan.


QU-CENG organises Qatar BIM User Day

  • Qatar University College of Engineering (QU-CENG) hosted the fifth Qatar Building Information Modelling (BIM) User Day, aiming at providing an exchange platform in Qatar and the Middle East to help experts and researchers share their knowledge, discuss new technologies, and identify new potentials for BIM in the regional construction industry.
  • Themed “Building Information Modelling – Implementation and Management”, the event was organised in conjunction with HOCHTIEF ViCon Qatar.
  • It brought together more than 300 local and international researchers and experts from the academia and industry sectors to network, exchange ideas, and discuss a wide range of topics related to BIM implementation and management.
  • Attendees included CENG acting associate dean for Academic Affairs Dr Mohammed Samaka, CENG Civil and Architectural Engineering Department Head Dr Ramzi Taha, HOCHTIEF ViCon Qatar Managing Director Christophe Weber, and Teesside University (UK) Director of Technology Future Institute (TFI) Prof Nashwan Dawood, as well as CENG faculty and staff.
  • The speakers presented a wide range of topics focused on “BIM introduction from a student’s perspective”, “BIM management process planning and implementation”, “BIM in use: Towards safer buildings and cities”, “The SC approach to project BIM collaboration”, “BIM process implementation and management on Qatar mega projects”, “Defining the role of the BIM Manager”, “BIM Interoperability Issues: Lessons learned from PLM”, and “Development of a whole lifecycle information flow approach enabled by BIM modeling protocols and technologies for Qatar Construction Industry”, among many others.  

    The programme agenda also featured workshop sessions and presentations on case studies, best practice examples, research achievements and the current national and regional developments in BMI implementation and management.


Art, design and architecture: what to see in autumn 2015

  • The last British Art Show was the best so far.
  • AS

    The dynamism, unexpectedness and sheer abundance of the art market makes these art fairs a window on the new – and the old.

  • Jonathan Jones

    Groundbreaking attempt to place pop art in its global context or another rehash of familiar names and images?

  • This long-overdue survey should allow us to focus more on the art, less on the man.
  • The spiritual art of the past echoes in his work – martyrs, triptychs, meditation, all that sacred jazz.


Should Britain’s ‘worst building’ be demolished?

  • That view of 20 Fenchurch Street that brought you to tears is the exact opposite of what he wanted.
  • Either 20 Fenchurch Street is there as long as it endures, or we do something about it.
  • After a day in Paris at Frank Gehry’s exhilarating fish-like, wave-like I found myself on the South Bank almost weeping at the view of 20 Fenchurch Street.
  • I still find it very hard to accept that Centre Point, a building that once personified hit-and-run property development, should now be a listed building.
  • Or even Sant’Elia, although buildings like 20 Fenchurch Street do seem to exploit modern engineering to create futurist dreams that would be a lot better left on paper.


BIM is ‘wake up call’ for Qatar’s contractors

  • RELATED ARTICLES: Revealed: How BIM can help procurement managers | BIM for FM: A Bird’s Eye View | How is BIM transforming GCC project delivery?
  • With Qatar’s rising number of projects – from skyscrapers to stadiums – what can be done to further encourage BIM adoption in the country?
  • Contractors adopting BIM across the whole project delivery would enhance Qatar’s standing as an innovation hub, while driving the country’s competitiveness on a global scale.

  • But on a countrywide level, the adoption of BIM by contractors lags behind the region and the rest of the world.
  • With BIM, organisations can deliver projects on time, on budget, and with a goal towards sustainability.


Turkey’s mega projects: Pipe dreams or game-changers?

  • Proponents of such major development projects see this as Turkey’s march toward becoming a fully developed and even more prosperous country, saying a resource-poor country can generate wealth through large-scale construction projects.
  • But critics are insistent that regulations are being violated or ignored, and the massive environmental damage these projects could cause will hurt the country even more in the long term.
  • This is not the case with this old centralist mindset that exists at the moment,” he told MEE.

    “These people [the government] see these big construction projects as purely a source to make money for themselves and those close to them,” he added.

  • The construction of hundreds of hydroelectric power stations in the region is also a major point of contention.
  • Local media reports say that work is continuing at some sites despite a local court ordering a halt to construction activity.