Lift-off! My 90-second ride into the future of virtual reality



  • For all the hype around 3D virtual and augmented realities, however, the technology still necessitates strapping a device to your head.
  • For anyone who has experienced virtual reality (VR) before, or been in any kind of simulator, the experience is all rather underwhelming, particularly after the warnings of motion sickness and expectations of an immersive bucking bronco ride.
  • Signing a health and safety waiver and confirming that I’m not overly sensitive to noise, I am strapped into a padded vest and virtual reality goggles and invited to straddle the turbine – and ominously told to hold on tightly.
  • Before you know it, you’re floating somewhere above an imaginary landscape and landing back in the room 90 seconds later.
  • Which is something that the spectacular downfall of Google Glass revealed the general public – if not hardcore gamers – are still very reluctant to do.


Source

Guided Tours To Challenge Views



  • But while some view buildings like the Southbank Centre and University of East Anglia (UEA) as examples of daring and dramatic design others argue they are an austere and bleak eyesore.
  • The vast Park Hill estate of flats in Sheffield is also being shown to the public as part of the Brutal Utopias tours starting on 25 September.
  • And while structures built from slabs of concrete may not be everyone’s cup of tea, the National Trust is keen to convince detractors they are much more than blots on the landscape.

  • The “teaching wall” is a building close to half a kilometre long made of unbroken concrete housing different schools of the university.
  • There are also the iconic accommodation blocks known as the “ziggurats” – stepped terraces of concrete and glass that hug the landscape.


Source

Timothy Hatton designs floating stairs for Deirdre Dyson gallery



  • London firm Timothy Hatton Architects has added a burnished steel staircase to rug designer Deirdre Dyson’s Chelsea carpet gallery as part of a renovation of her studio.
  • The rest of the building has been transformed into a gallery, with rugs displayed hanging on metal frameworks.
  • Lighting for the gallery was provided by Lighting Design International, who treated the building as an art gallery rather than a carpet showroom.
  • Deirdre Dyson had previously used the building as a studio and showroom, but decided to overhaul the space to incorporate a gallery that could also display rugs as works of art.
  • The architects added glass bricks to the back wall of the gallery, to bring additional natural light into the space.


Source

The Legacy of Gego at Dominique Lévy



  • In conjunction with the exhibition, Dominique Lévy will publish a two-volume collection of illustrations, texts and previously unpublished archival material.

    “Gego: Autobiography of a Line” will be showing from September 10 – October 24 2015, at Dominique Lévy, 909 Madison and 73rd Street, New York City.

  • The celebrated historical installation will now be re-imagined at Dominique Lévy, bringing together the original Chorros pieces.
  • She considered her wire sculptures a form of drawing, writing in her diary: “Sculpture: three dimensional forms of solid material.
  • It will be followed in Spring 2016 by a second exhibition devoted to Gego at the gallery’s London space at 22 Old Bond Street in Mayfair.

  • Having worked as designer and architect, and raising a family, Gego was already in her 40s when she became a full-time artist.


Source

Art, design and architecture: what to see in autumn 2015



  • The last British Art Show was the best so far.
  • AS

    The dynamism, unexpectedness and sheer abundance of the art market makes these art fairs a window on the new – and the old.

  • Jonathan Jones

    Groundbreaking attempt to place pop art in its global context or another rehash of familiar names and images?

  • This long-overdue survey should allow us to focus more on the art, less on the man.
  • The spiritual art of the past echoes in his work – martyrs, triptychs, meditation, all that sacred jazz.


Source

Should Britain’s ‘worst building’ be demolished?



  • That view of 20 Fenchurch Street that brought you to tears is the exact opposite of what he wanted.
  • Either 20 Fenchurch Street is there as long as it endures, or we do something about it.
  • After a day in Paris at Frank Gehry’s exhilarating fish-like, wave-like I found myself on the South Bank almost weeping at the view of 20 Fenchurch Street.
  • I still find it very hard to accept that Centre Point, a building that once personified hit-and-run property development, should now be a listed building.
  • Or even Sant’Elia, although buildings like 20 Fenchurch Street do seem to exploit modern engineering to create futurist dreams that would be a lot better left on paper.


Source

Cheshire firm nabs £11.5m Harrogate Council offices Ι Construction Enquirer



  • Warrington-based Harry Fairclough Construction has beaten rival national contractors to secure the job to build new civic offices for Harrogate Council.
  • The new council offices will be built at Knapping Mount, a brownfield site originally earmarked for housing, which councillors approved planning permission for back in March.
  • The existing building at Crescent Gardens is being sold to developers to help finance the project, which will see five council offices rationalised into one site.
  • London architect  Farrell & Clark designed the civic building and offices to achieve BREEAM Very Good rating.
  • The £30m turnover contractor nabbed the job with a £11.5m bid against Interserve’s Yorkshire office, Graham Construction and McLaughlin & Harvey.


Source

London’s Walkie Talkie judged UK’s worst building



  • A City of London skyscraper, nicknamed the Walkie Talkie, has won the annual Carbuncle Cup, awarded to a building judged to be the UK’s worst.
  • To find a winner, readers of Building Design nominate their most hated buildings, which are then whittled down into a shortlist by a jury of architects and writers.

  • Mr Lane, editor of Building Design magazine, said it was a challenge to find anyone with something positive to say about the Walkie Talkie, officially known as 20 Fenchurch Street, which was completed in April 2014.
  • Thomas Lane, who runs the awards, said the carbuncle “crashes into London’s skyline like an unwelcome party guest”.
  • Other buildings vying for architecture’s wooden spoon were Parliament House, Southampton City Gateway and Woodward Hall in north-west London.


Source

Cameron Sinclair interview about humanitarian architecture



  • Cameron Sinclair: I’m the co-founder of Architecture for Humanity and I ran that for close to 14 years.
  • They’ve been snaked there, they’ve had a taste of humanitarian work and they would rather starve than work in an office.
  • “And I am never going to win the Pritzker Prize, I’m going to die happy knowing that.”
  • “I will never do a skyscraper in my life ever, I’m going to die happy knowing that,” said Sinclair.
  • Cameron Sinclair: It makes it hard to critique because I’m doing something similar.


Source

Super Lamp by Martine Bedin



  • Pomo summer: Memphis Group designer Martine Bedin’s Super Lamp can be trailed along like a dog on a leash, demonstrating the collective’s playful style.
  • “We were always discussing the possibilities of new furniture, furniture that could move,” said Bedin. “I was designing everything on wheels at this time.
  • The Super Lamp was one of a variety of lighting designs that Bedin created for Memphis.
  • The Super Lamp is still produced and sold through the Memphis Milano gallery, and has remained one of Memphis’ most recognisable pieces.
  • Sottsass and his wife Barbara Radice also visited Bedin in Paris, and spotted the design for the Super Lamp while flicking through her sketch book.


Source